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UMBC Summer & Winter Blog

Featured Course: Special Topics: Business Ethics

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PHIL 399

  According to a 2012 study conducted by the Ethical Compliance Initiative, 45 percent of U.S. workers witnessed some sort of misconduct in their workplace – over half of those workers reported their observations. Shockingly, 22 percent of those who reported their observations, also experienced some sort of retaliation. What constitutes misconduct in the workplace? What can we do about it? What […]

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Featured Course: Social Problems in American Society

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SOCY201

  From the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement to the historically divisive 2016 presidential election, there’s never a better time to discuss social issues.  SOCY 201 – Social Problems in American Society provides you with the chance to understand issues such as race and ethnic conflict, criminal justice reform, social justice, and economic inequality. How will the President-Elect’s […]

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Featured Course: The Politics of Poverty

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POLI 446

  According to Feed America, 43.1 million Americans or 13.5 percent of the population lived in poverty in 2015. The Cato institute tells us that federal government spends $668 billion on social welfare programs each year. Combine that figure with state and local spending, and our country contributes $1 billion to counteract poverty annually. But where does that money actually go? How […]

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Featured Course: Introduction to Scientific Reasoning

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phil 248

  Ever wonder why certain things happen, or how your mind reaches certain conclusions? Do we begin with a hypothesis and explore options to reach a conclusion? Deductive reasoning. Or do we start with what we see around us, drawing patterns from observations and using those trends to make a generalization? Inductive reasoning. This winter, explore the various ways to […]

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Featured Course: Ancient Science and Technology

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HIST 330

The first recorded observations of comets, solar eclipses and supernovae came from the Chinese. We can thank the Greeks for gears, screws, catapults, and crowbows. The Romans were pioneers in civil engineering and built a highly sophisticated  urban civilization. The ancient Egyptians developed simple machines, such as the ramp, to make the construction process easier (After all, the pyramids weren’t built […]

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